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Upcoming convention fun-times

Join me at Boskone (February 12-14, 2021), which’ll be online and running for the low weekend price of $25 this year. It’s the science fiction and fantasy convention I grew up at, with discussions of books, science, art, games, music, and more.

Better yet, I’m on panels this year, and moderating one, so you get that many more opportunities to see me in glorious Zoom-vision. I’m getting to be with some extremely cool people, too, so I’m super excited about this.

My schedule is below:

Writing Relatable Characters Format: Panel

12 Feb 2021, Friday 18:30 – 19:30, Carlton – (Mtg Room) (Virtual Westin)

No matter how realistic a character is, that doesn’t mean they will be relatable. So, what does it take to write a character who gels with the reader? How do you avoid friends of the protagonist being relegated to token sidekick status? What helps a reader understand and sympathize with protagonists who are far beyond their own lived experience? And how do you write them if they are beyond yours?

Christine Taylor-Butler (M), Paul Tremblay, Katherine Crighton, E. Lily Yu, Carlos Hernandez

The Shape of Robots to Come Format: Panel

13 Feb 2021, Saturday 10:00 – 11:00, Burroughs (Webinar) (Virtual Westin)

Robots in fiction are often androids — bipedal, two arms, head on neck — people-shaped. After all, the term “robot” goes back to 1920 when Karel Čapek introduced it in his play R.U.R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots). However, today’s robots have form following function e.g. robotic vacuum cleaners, pharmacy prescription-filling robots, and driverless automobiles. The panelists discuss how the image of the robot has changed and developed, both in fact and in fiction.

Suzanne Palmer, Katherine Crighton (M), S.B. Divya, Charles Stross

Cyborgs Are People Too Format: Panel

13 Feb 2021, Saturday 16:00 – 17:00, Carlton – (Mtg Room) (Virtual Westin)

Cyborgs, constructed of flesh, bone, steel, and advanced technologies, are full of potential and possibility. Let’s talk about meldings of man and machine in fact and in fiction. Portrayals often focus on cyborgs’ humanity, or on their lack of it. When is which appropriate? What distinguishes cyborgs from augmented humans?

S L Huang, Katherine Crighton, Stephen P. Kelner (M)

(Image credit: Image by Alexander Antropov from Pixabay)

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